FAQs about José Can Speak + #NoFeeFriday

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FAQs about José Can Speak + #NoFeeFriday

José Can Speak is tomorrow! 

In excitement for the show, we are waiving service fees on tickets today!

Get your tickets now

$20 in advance, $25 at the door

 

Need more info? Here are answers to common questions about the show:

When is the show?

Our production of José Can Speak is tomorrow Saturday, March 25. We will have two shows at 3pm and 7pm.

Where is the show located?

The show will be at Alloy Studios,  5530 Penn Ave (between Stratford  & Negley)

Is parking available?

There is metered parking available on the street. The street meters run 8AM-6PM. Additionally, there are two metered lots: one on Centre Ave and Highland Ave, and another on Beatty St behind the library. The lot meters run from 8AM - 10PM. 

What time do doors open?

For the 3pm show doors will open at 2pm. For the 7pm show doors will open at 6pm. We will have some snacks and wine available for guests who arrive early! 

What forms of payment will you accept at the door?

We will accept cash and credit/debit cards at the door. Tickets at the door are $25. If you need to purchase tickets at the door please arrive early! Doors open at 2pm for the 3pm show, and 6pm for the 7pm show. 

Can I bring my kids?

There is no age restriction for the show but use your discretion. The play contains some curse words, content of a sexual nature, and descriptions of domestic violence. Similar to a PG 13 movie.

What language is the show in?

José Can Speak will be performed in English, with some Spanglish mixed in.

Is the show about men or women? 

The show contains monologues about men, spoken from the perspective of men, but written and performed by women. Director Linda Nieves-Powell conceived of the idea of Latina women performing as their male counterparts while touring the country with her plays, Yo Soy Latina! and Soul Latina. She says, "Male audience members would always ask me when I was going to write a male version of the Latino experience and I would always answer, I’m not a man, so why don’t you try it." But after numerous requests she decided to take on the challenge! Inspired by real people, the colorful monologues in José Can Speak will entertain, educate, and provoke insightful thought about what truly resides in the heart of a Latino man as told by the Latinas.

How did this show come together?

Café Con Leche’s Tara Sherry-Torres first encountered writer and director Linda Nieves-Powell 10 years ago when she saw a performance of her play Yo Soy Latina! at the famous Nuyorican Poets Café in NYC. The play made an incredible impact on her life and she hoped to bring it to Pittsburgh one day. In 2015, this became a reality when Café Con Leche hosted a production of Yo Soy Latina! as part of Women of Color HERstory month in partnership with New Voices Pittsburgh. After an incredibly successful show in 2015, Café Con Leche is proud to welcome Linda Nieves-Powell back to Pittsburgh for this production of José Can Speak! 

Linda brings with her the original cast of Yo Soy Latina! and José Can Speak: Michelle Concha, Antonia Marrero, and Lina Sarrello, three talented actors and dynamic leaders in the performing arts.

Click here to read more about the director, cast, and the show! 


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TODAY: José Can Speak tickets 2 for $25!

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TODAY: José Can Speak tickets 2 for $25!

Our production of José Can Speak is just 4 days away!

In appreciation of our audience we are offering a special deal today. If you buy two $20 tickets for José Can Speak you will automatically get $15 off your purchase. That's two tickets for $25! Get your tickets and spread the word!! This offer is available until midnight today. 

Saturday, March 25
3pm & 7pm
Alloy Studios

Click here to get tickets!
 


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Café Con Leche Presents JOSE CAN SPEAK: A Play By Award-Winning Writer Linda Nieves-Powell

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Café Con Leche Presents JOSE CAN SPEAK: A Play By Award-Winning Writer Linda Nieves-Powell

On Saturday, March 25, 2017 Café Con Leche is hosting two performances of José Can Speak, a play by award-winning writer Linda Nieves-Powell.

Linda Nieves-Powell conceived of the idea of Latina women performing as their male counterparts while touring the country with her plays, Yo Soy Latina! and Soul Latina. She says, "Male audience members would always ask me when I was going to write a male version of the Latino experience and I would always answer, I’m not a man, so why don’t you try it." But after numerous requests she decided to take on the challenge.

The monologues in José Can Speak range from comical to serious and explore a variety of topics. From the war in Iraq, to the guy at the Copa looking for love, or the gay Latino who marries a woman to get his father off his back, these stories all have one thing in common, they are inspired by real people. Performed as a series of colorful monologues, this show will entertain, educate, and provoke insightful thought about what truly resides in the heart of Latino men as told by the Latinas.

JOSE CAN SPEAK

A play by Linda Nieves-Powell

WRITTEN BY

Linda Nieves-Powell and Lina Sarrello

FEATURING

Michelle Concha, Antonia Marrero, Lina Sarrello

WHEN & WHERE

Saturday, March 25, 3pm & 7pm

Alloy Studios | 5530 Penn Avenue | Pittsburgh, PA 15206

TICKETS

$20 in advance, $25 at the door

Click here to purchase tickets

ABOUT THE DIRECTOR

Linda Nieves-Powell is a professional writer and director and a member of the Writers Guild East. Her fiction and non-fiction work has been published by Atria/Simon & Schuster, Akashic Books, Latina, and Estylo Magazines. In 2014 Linda was commissioned to write the Nueva Latina monologues, a stage play for Orgullosa, a Procter and Gamble social media brand that creates empowering content for the Latina community. The Nueva Latina monologues were a featured performance at LULAC and Hispanicize. Her award-winning play Yo Soy Latina! has been performed at over 400 colleges in the U.S., off Broadway, and at the Tony-award winning theater company Crossroads. Her full-length screenplay Six of Me, was a semi-finalist at the 2013 Sundance Screenwriting Lab, and her short script "Forget me Not" was a finalist in the 2012 HBO NYILFF script competition.  Linda is also a photographer who created the Latina Icons photo tribute project and a filmmaker with several notable festival credits.

HISTORY OF THIS PRODUCTION

Café Con Leche’s Tara Sherry-Torres first encountered writer and director Linda Nieves-Powell 10 years ago when she saw a performance of her play Yo Soy Latina! at the famous Nuyorican Poets Café in NYC. The play made an incredible impact on her life and she hoped to bring it to Pittsburgh one day. In 2015, this became a reality when Café Con Leche hosted a production of Yo Soy Latina! as part of Women of Color HERstory month in partnership with New Voices Pittsburgh. After an incredibly successful show in 2015, Café Con Leche is proud to welcome Linda Nieves-Powell back to Pittsburgh for this production of José Can Speak! 

Linda brings with her the original cast of Yo Soy Latina! and José Can Speak: Michelle Concha, Antonia Marrero, and Lina Sarrello, three talented actors and dynamic leaders in the performing arts. Read more about the cast here.


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Is Pittsburgh an Immigrant Town? Updates on the local fight for immigrant rights and what you can do to help

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Is Pittsburgh an Immigrant Town? Updates on the local fight for immigrant rights and what you can do to help

With the rise of Trump’s anti-immigrant rhetoric and policies, there has been heightened concern for the wellbeing of immigrants living in the United States, in particular the undocumented community. This is true in Pittsburgh, where hundreds demonstrated last month during the Day Withut Immigrants. But outside of large demonstrations, many people are uncertain about the best ways to get involved and take action. We talked to organizers Christina Acuña Castillo and Gabe McMoreland from the Thomas Merton Center for suggestions.

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How A City Of Immigrants Became First To Drop Sanctuary City Status

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How A City Of Immigrants Became First To Drop Sanctuary City Status

On January 25, Trump signed an executive order denying federal funding to Sanctuary Cities. The very next day, Miami-Dade Mayor Carlos Giménez ordered county officials to comply. While Miami was never officially considered a Sanctuary City, the move sent waves of shock and disbelief across the country. How could an elected official who is an immigrant himself be the first to comply with such aggressively anti-immigrant policy?

In a country where Latinos are largely marginalized, reading news like this about someone with the last name “Giménez” creates a certain cognitive dissonance. While it may seem baffling, Giménez’s decision is not surprising at all considering the skewed political context he emerges from.

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Five Questions To Ask Yourself If You Dislike Immigration

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Five Questions To Ask Yourself If You Dislike Immigration

Martin Esqivel-Hernandez was deported back to Mexico this week. This is really awful and sad. There are no words that can be used to describe the loss this is for his children, his wife, his friends, and the community at large.

Immigration is incredibly complicated, with many push and full factors intricately linked to a capitalist system, which demands cheap and free labor to thrive. (You can read about some of those issues on Cafe Con Leche's post about sanctuary cities.) Intersecting the issue of immigration are the concepts of land ownership, land use and borders, which when put into a historical context displays a long legacy of colonialism, slavery, and exploitation. 

Below are five questions for people to answer if they find themselves thinking they don't like immigration or immigrants. These are not the only questions to ask yourself when analyzing this topic, but they are a good place to start.

Five questions for people who say they don't like immigration. 

Directions: Read & answer these five questions. If you do not know the answer, google it.

  1. Who made The United States of America arbitrators of this land? Follow up question: Who decided where the borders would be between the United States and Mexico?
  2. Did you know there were already people living on this land before the Europeans came? Follow up info: Many of the people that are called "illegal aliens" [undocumented immigrants] are descendants of these native people.
  3. Have you read about the history between the United States of America and Mexico? You can read Cafe Con Leche's blog post on this history by clicking here.
  4. Do you know how much food, goods, and services would cost were it not for an unseen "illegal" workforce performing much of the labor?
  5. How does USA foreign policy effect immigration? Follow up question: Do you know what USA Foreign policy has been since the late 1800's?

For more information you can visit:


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What last week showed us

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What last week showed us

On Friday, January 27 president Donald Trump signed an executive order blocking citizens of seven Muslim-majority countries from entering the US for 90 days. The order also shuts down refugee settlement for 120 days and bans Syrian refugees from entering the US until further notice.

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Latino Parents United in Action (LPUA) - Pittsburgh

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Latino Parents United in Action (LPUA) - Pittsburgh

In our first blog of 2017 Cafe Con Leche is profiling the parent led Latino advocacy group, Latino Parents in Action (LPUA). A collective movement, anchored by A+ Schools. If you are interested in learning more contact Amie Matson, Amatson@aplusschools.org or (412) 697-1298 x113. This blog is bilingual, for the English version scroll down.


Spanish

Cuando llega en un nuevo país es difícil manejar el sistema escolar. ¿Tengo derechos? ¿Cuáles son mis obligaciones? ¿Cómo asegurarme que mi hijo está progresando en su educación? Estas son solo algunas de las preguntas de las familias inmigrantes. Es difícil encontrar respuestas especialmente cuando el idioma y las costumbres son diferentes.

En febrero de 2014, A+ Schools formó una relación con el Centro Latino y Vibrant Pittsburgh para dar atención a las barreras al sistema escolar que encuentran las familias Latinas y otros inmigrantes. El grupo empezó con ocho padres y sigue creciendo cada mes. El grupo se llama Latino Families United in Action (Padres Latinos Unidos en Acción). Tiene eso nombre porque no solo quiere hablar de los desafíos, quiere hacer los cambios necesarios.

En su primer año, los miembros aprendieron lo básico del sistema educativa de Pittsburgh de Amie Matson, la organizadora de A+ Schools. Aprendieron cómo saber de las cancelaciones del día escolar por la nieve, cómo encontrar apoyos para el hijo como el IEP (plan de educación individualizado) y programas para estudiantes avanzados.

Después de reunir juntos por un año, el grupo decidió comunicar sus preocupaciones con las barreras a la educación al público. Pidió del consejo escolar más trabajadores en las escuelas bilingües en los idiomas: español, francés y árabe para reflejar la población cambiando. Pidió que los bilingües estén disponibles para cada evento del distrito. Los padres y parejas del grupo LPUA trabajaron para conseguir más que 500 firmes en la petición y los presentaron al Consejo Escolar de los Pittsburgh Public Schools durante la primavera de 2015. Testificaron ante el consejo en español sobre los desafíos que han enfrentado y crearon un video para compartir sus experiencias con el público.

Sus esfuerzos de defensa valen la pena. En julio el grupo, que ahora consiste de más que cincuenta miembros activos, recibió miembros importantes del distrito. Ellos vinieron a participar en una conversación clave. Treinta y un personas asistieron la reunión del grupo que incluyó dos directores de escuelas, cinco miembros del consejo escolar del Pittsburgh Public Schools, trabajadores de la oficina central y el nuevo Superintendente de Escuelas. Ellos escucharon a los desafíos y las barreras que se encuentran las familias y exploraron las soluciones a los problemas.

El grupo LPUA tuvo éxito con el establecimiento del sistema telefónico con operadores bilingües y una página web multilingüe para los Pittsburgh Public Schools. También el consejo escolar aprobó dar fondos para cubrir los gastos de los servicios de traducción y contratar un psicólogo bilingüe para el distrito. Durante el año escolar 2016-2017, el distrito de Pittsburgh encontró dos bilingües y se busca uno más.

Los miembros del grupo Latino Parents United in Action saben que todavía tiene trabajo que hacer y siempre quieren mejorar la asociación entre el sistema escolar y la población de inmigrantes y refugios que sigue creciendo en Pittsburgh. Si quiere apoyar, puede enviar un correo electrónico a Amatson@aplusschools.org o llamar Amie Matson (412) 697-1298 x113.


English

When you’re new to a country, trying to figure out a public school system that’s complex can be daunting.  What are my rights? What are my obligations? How do I make sure that my child is on track in her/his education? These are but a few of the questions that many families have. When customs and language are different, getting answers to them can be daunting.

In February of 2014, A+ Schools partnered with the Latino Family Center and Vibrant Pittsburgh to address the barriers Latino and immigrant families face within education.  The group began with eight parents, and continues to grow with each passing month.  The parents call themselves “Latino Parents United in Action (LPUA)”, because they don’t want to just talk about the challenges; they want to take action to change things. 

In their first year, they learned the basics of Pittsburgh’s public education system from A+ Schools organizer, Amie Matson. The topics covered ranged from where to look to find out if school is cancelled due to weather, to how your child can access different learning supports through Individualized Educational Plans and the Gifted Program.

After a year of meeting the group decided to take their concerns about the barriers their families faced in the system to the public.  They petitioned the school board in English, Spanish, French and Arabic for more bilingual staff within the district to reflect the changing population, and that bilingual staff be available at every districtwide function.  LPUA parents and partners helped to obtain over 500 signatures on the petition, which was then presented to the Pittsburgh Public School Board in the spring of 2015.  They followed up the petition by testifying at the board in Spanish about the challenges they had experienced and they created a video to share their experience with a broader audience. 

Their advocacy efforts have begun to pay off. This past July LPUA, which has now grown to include over 50 participating members, was able to get key district leaders to come meet with them and hear their concerns.  A total of 31 people attended, including two principals, five school board members, four central office staff, and the new Superintendent.  The group was able to discuss in person some of the barriers they face as a group, and to explore possible solutions to overcome these challenges. 

In addition to getting an audience with key decision makers, the parents were able to get the district to implement a multilingual parent hotline and a multilingual district website.  Additionally, they got the school board to approve an increase in budget for translation costs to cover the growing demand, as well as additional funds to hire a bilingual psychologist for the district.  In the current school year, the District hired two new bilingual staff and they are looking to fill a third bilingual position.

The members of the Latino Parents United in Action group know their work is not done, and there are still ways to continue to improve upon the partnership between the public school system and the growing immigrant and refugee community here in Pittsburgh.  If you are interested in getting involved, contact Amie Matson at amatson@aplusschools.org or (412)697-1298 x113. 

Visit A+ Schools Website


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Una Locura...

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Una Locura...

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